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El juego de la referencia

Cosas que me gustan, sobre todo si tienen que ver con libros, imágenes y referencias.

nevver:

Never quit, Bob Willoughby

Oh.

housingworksbookstore:

blackballoonpublishing:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

vintageanchorbooks:

HOW LONG IT TAKES TO READ THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR BOOKS: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/how-long-it-takes-to-read-the-worlds-most-popular-books

My brain likes this like this.

This is almost too good.

I gotta go, I have some reading to do.

¿Sin tiempo para leer?, reconsidere usted cuánto puede invertir. En el fondo, no es tanto :P

(via publishersweekly)

Lifetime Achievement Award Goes to a Totally Deserving Ursula K. Le Guin

neil-gaiman:

dwdjohnson:

Finally

I am so proud to be involved in this.

1 day ago- 887
oktotally:

business lunch

Aplica para hoy, ¿no?

oktotally:

business lunch

Aplica para hoy, ¿no?

nevver:

Pantone

Cerveza :P

It’s in literature that true life can be found. It’s under the mask of fiction that you can tell the truth.

Gao Xinjian (via shortstoriesanalyzed)

The truth.

(via ebookporn)

itscolossal:

New cut paper light sculptures by Hari & Deepti. So much more to see, go here now!

explore-blog:

Leo Tolstoy, born on this day in 1828, on finding meaning in a meaningless world – spectacular read, the kind that stays with you for life.

Feliz cumple, Tolstói.

explore-blog:

Leo Tolstoy, born on this day in 1828, on finding meaning in a meaningless world – spectacular read, the kind that stays with you for life.

Feliz cumple, Tolstói.

explore-blog:

Maurice Sendak's darkest, most controversial, yet most personal and most hopeful children’s book:

The book’s true magic lies in its integration of Sendak’s many identities — the son of Holocaust survivors, a gay man witnessing the devastation of AIDS, a deft juggler of darkness and light. 
St. Paul’s Bakery and Orphanage, where the story is set, is a horrible place reminiscent of Auschwitz. In the game of bridge, “diamonds are trumps,” a phrase with a poignant double meaning, subtly implicating the avarice of the world’s diamond-slingers and Donald Trumps in the systemic social malady of homelessness — something reflected in the clever wordplay of the book’s title itself, suggesting that homelessness isn’t limited to the homeless but is a problem we’re all in together, equally responsible for its solution.
Jack and Guy appear like a gay couple, and their triumph in rescuing the child resembles an adoption, two decades before that was an acceptable subject for a children’s book. “And we’ll bring him up / As other folk do,” the final pages read — and, once again, a double meaning reveals itself as two characters are depicted with wings on their backs, lifting off into the sky, lending the phrase “we’ll bring him up” an aura of salvation. In the end, the three curl up as a makeshift family amidst a world that is still vastly imperfect but full of love.

See more here.

explore-blog:

Maurice Sendak's darkest, most controversial, yet most personal and most hopeful children’s book:

The book’s true magic lies in its integration of Sendak’s many identities — the son of Holocaust survivors, a gay man witnessing the devastation of AIDS, a deft juggler of darkness and light. 

St. Paul’s Bakery and Orphanage, where the story is set, is a horrible place reminiscent of Auschwitz. In the game of bridge, “diamonds are trumps,” a phrase with a poignant double meaning, subtly implicating the avarice of the world’s diamond-slingers and Donald Trumps in the systemic social malady of homelessness — something reflected in the clever wordplay of the book’s title itself, suggesting that homelessness isn’t limited to the homeless but is a problem we’re all in together, equally responsible for its solution.

Jack and Guy appear like a gay couple, and their triumph in rescuing the child resembles an adoption, two decades before that was an acceptable subject for a children’s book. “And we’ll bring him up / As other folk do,” the final pages read — and, once again, a double meaning reveals itself as two characters are depicted with wings on their backs, lifting off into the sky, lending the phrase “we’ll bring him up” an aura of salvation. In the end, the three curl up as a makeshift family amidst a world that is still vastly imperfect but full of love.

See more here.